Shamed! — Wheel Tales of Willow City

Shamed 00 Shamed 01 Shamed 02 Shamed 03 Shamed 04 Shamed 05 Shamed 06 Shamed 07 Shamed 08 Shamed 09 Shamed 10 Shamed 11 Shamed 12 Shamed featureThere are many different sorts of disabilities that might put a person into a wheelchair. Not all confine a person to a chair 100% of the time. Many people are lucky enough to be able to stand, with or without support for short periods of time. Some can even walk short distances, but not for more than a few dozen steps. Sometimes it is a heart issue, other times other issues.

So please don’t judge. Please don’t assume. People also aren’t obligated to tell you extremely personal information like what health problems they might have.

I hope you remember that when you next see someone with a wheel chair stand for a bit or even walk a few steps. While there may be some people that are faking injuries to defraud the insurance company, that is only a very small percentage of the population.


I hope you enjoy these and I would really appreciate your spreading the word. My stories are spread by word-of-mouth so this is the way that others might also see them.

Thank you!

DWPenner


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Spun Out! – 3 — Wheel Tales of Willow City

Spun Out 00 Spun Out 01 Spun Out 02 Spun Out 03 Spun Out 04 Spun Out 05 Spun Out 06 Spun Out 07 Spun Out 08 Spun Out 09 Spun Out 10I’ve seen many bicyclists riding on the sidewalk as I travel around. They travel so much faster than pedestrian traffic and seem to take up more room than a person walking or even running. I don’t know how often I’ve had to dodge cyclists but it has been far too often. I can only imagine what it is like if you are in a wheelchair or on a mobility scooter… or if you have young children with you or some problem with mobility.

Recently we even had an elderly person hit and knocked over by someone in a mobility scooter going very fast down the sidewalk. The person struck ended up with a fractured skull and broken hip.

It’s actually illegal for most people to be riding on a sidewalk. It’s a crime that they do so and morally even more so, I think, when there is a dedicated “bike lane” on that road.

IF you must ride a bike, or skateboard on a sidewalk, remember that you are a guest there and it really isn’t someplace that you have any sort of right-of-way. Really, in my opinion that might even go for running and mobility scooters that can move at running speeds and beyond. Look Out for people on the sidewalk. It is you who should yield and give way, not them. That is even if you tinkle your bell or toot your horn.

PS I realized after doing the frames for the cartoon that I neglected to put helmets on the cyclists. If I re-did the art I’d have bicycle helmets on the riders. Please remember to wear your bike helmet. Even if not for your safety, wear it as a good example for children and young people. I know that if you are of my age, you likely rode for decades without even knowing there were helmets or that anyone would wear one unless they were racing in some event. But if kids see adults not wearing helmets, they lose respect for the laws governing such things.


I hope you enjoy these and I would really appreciate your spreading the word. My stories are spread by word-of-mouth so this is the way that others might also see them.

Thank you!

DWPenner


For more stories check out:

 

The Further Adventures of Alfred Duncan — Wheel Tales of Willow City

Albert Duncan00Albert Duncan01Albert Duncan02Albert Duncan03Albert Duncan04Albert Duncan05Albert Duncan06Albert Duncan07Albert Duncan08Albert Duncan09I hope you enjoy these and I would really appreciate your spreading the word. My stories are spread by word-of-mouth so this is the way that others might also see them.

There is considerable planning involved in making public and private structures accessible. Sometimes it can’t be done, but most places are successful. A couple of friends of mine told me about something they came across. After ascending the wheelchair ramps to the entrance of a building, they were stymied to find two or three steps at the front entrance. Those steps created a barrier to anyone in a wheelchair that wasn’t a wheelchair athlete.

There seems always to be more work needed to make buildings wheelchair accessible. Perhaps it is the fact that many places are well done that make the bad ones stand out more… but I hear horror stories still.

Of course there are many who make huge efforts to help!


This strip* was published before as “Wheel Tales of We’ll Make Cents” but we thought it would be better to publish more independently — hence the change in venue and name to “Wheel Tales of Willow City”.

We'll Make CentsWe’ll Make Cents” is an organization that helps support a number of not-for-profit causes which might get overlooked. Why not pop over and give them a visit and check out their current project.

Donations are actually hard to come by for Charities and other not-for-profit organizations. Consider what you might be able to donate. It might be a good time to clean that closet, attic, cellar, shed, or garage! You might have someone else’s next treasured possession. Perhaps you don’t live near Auckland and We’ll Make Cents, but there are people in need everywhere!

DWPenner

* Only the first stories were on We’ll Make cents. The more recent stories are being published here first.

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Overtime — Wheel Tales of Willow City

Overtime 00Overtime 01Overtime 02Overtime 03Overtime 04Overtime 05Overtime 06Overtime 07Overtime 08Overtime 09Overtime 10I hope you enjoy these and I would really appreciate your spreading the word. My stories are spread by word-of-mouth so this is the way that others might also see them.

Being fairly regularly able, I have found that when I cross many major arterial roads at a light, I barely make it before the light for the road traffic. I don’t mean when the pedestrian crossing light changes from “Walk” to “Don’t Walk”, but when the light for the vehicular traffic changes from red to green.

I can only imagine what it is like for anyone that travels below normal walking speed. I consider what it is like for someone with kids and groceries. I imagine what it is like for someone who walks with only one leg — proud at their progress to walking with a prosthetic, but just a bit slower than most able-bodied folk. I imagine what it is like for the person using a walker. I know that the lights can only be so long for each cycle of a light, but I know of many who barely make it “If” they start the second the “Walk” signal comes on.

I’ve seen a system where all the traffic lights turn red and all the pedestrian crossing lights turn to “Walk” — including two new diagonal cross-walks crossing from corner to corner in the intersection. That probably gives at least twice as much time to cross the intersections. Crossing diagonally means only a single crossing where you would have had to make two crossings without the diagonal. It makes a bit of sense to me and traffic still flows at nearly the same rate. (So I hear.)

Regardless, short pedestrian crossing times can impair some people’s ability to cross intersections safely.


This strip* was published before as “Wheel Tales of We’ll Make Cents” but we thought it would be better to publish more independently — hence the change in venue and name to “Wheel Tales of Willow City”.

We'll Make CentsWe’ll Make Cents” is an organization that helps support a number of not-for-profit causes which might get overlooked. Why not pop over and give them a visit and check out their current project.

Donations are actually hard to come by for Charities and other not-for-profit organizations. Consider what you might be able to donate. It might be a good time to clean that closet, attic, cellar, shed, or garage! You might have someone else’s next treasured possession. Perhaps you don’t live near Auckland and We’ll Make Cents, but there are people in need everywhere!

DWPenner

* Only the first stories were on We’ll Make cents. The more recent stories are being published here first.

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